Inside To Catch an Heiress

  • The working title of this book was Starry Night. If you read carefully, you will find a theme throughout the book about stars and starry nights.
  • I had a lot of fun with the “definitions” that appear at the beginning of each chapter, but they turned out to be a LOT of work. It turns out that dictionary definitions are not public domain, which meant I would have to apply for permission to use them in my book. This meant that all the definitions would have to come from the same dictionary, so that I could make only one application for permission. The problem was, we discovered this after I’d written the book. So I ended up hunched over the Oxford English Dictionary (the kind you need a magnifying glass to read) for hours, looking up new definitions. Three cheers for Oxford University Press, who graciously waived their permission fees, obviously deciding that romance novels = excellent public relations!
  • To Catch an Heiress is the only one of my books that was conceived out of an opening line. The sentence: “Caroline Trent hadn’t meant to shoot Percival Prewitt, but she had, and now he was dead,” popped into my head, and I knew I had to figure out a book to go with it. (Except that Caroline wasn’t yet named Caroline. See below.)
  • Caroline’s name changed twice during the first few weeks of writing. First I named her Nathalie, but that didn’t seem to fit. Then I named her Lily. After about two hours it became apparent that wouldn’t work. Lily sounded too much like Ellie (the heroine of Brighter Than The Sun, which I’d just finished writing), and while this probably would not have confused any of my readers, it confused the heck out of me!

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